• Kim Cotton

Rip Current Risk

The thought of families heading to our beautiful, local beaches and having tragedy strike makes me feel ill. I could not imagine. Therefore, I am trying to do my part to help save even one life by adding the Oak Island Water Rescue (OIWR) Rip Current Risk on my website. There is a QR Code and the link to OIWR.


The OIWR site has a lot of useful information. Please check it out before heading to the beach.

The directions below are how to save yourself from rip currents. Rip currents are the more dangerous relative of longshore currents. In all cases, you should first try to avoid them by recognizing the conditions where they can form, or in the case of rip currents, by the tell-tale signs they make in the water. Rip currents are most common a couple of hours before and after low tide. If you are caught in one of these currents, your first action should be to yell for help! Making sure other people know you are in danger is critical information we may need to rescue you if you’re unable to escape the current on your own.


Be safe and enjoy your time in Brunswick County.

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